How a Composite Image Comes Together / by Diana Lundin

I recently entered four of my composite images in a contest and one of the requirements was to show all of the reference images used to create it. Well, first of all, it's not that much fun gathering all of these things together but instead of whining about it, I'm going to show you all four. 

Each of them has the exact photographs or objects used to create the images. Yes, if you're a faithful reader of The Secret World of Pets, you've seen these images time and time again. But now you get to peek behind the curtain. 

The composites take different times to create each one; one took me three days and then was tweaked for weeks. Other simpler ones may take a few hours. Again, it's the tweaking that can take time. I call it polishing the polish. One tiny thing you want to change and maybe only you will notice it can take so much longer than it does to initially put it together. I've heard it said of film editing and I'll appropriate it here -- you don't finish a composite, you abandon it. 

And just as an aside, sometimes composites can look really scary when you're laying them down. You often have to put a lot of "ingredients" into the mix and it is uugggggly. But then you start sizing things, moving things around, change their colors, add shadows, tones and lighting and miraculously it somehow all comes together.

So here are the four!

 Shhh...

Shhh...

 Love Song

Love Song

 Adrift

Adrift